Skip to main content

About Gita Mehta

This is about the Indian writer, Gita Mehta, who attended Woodstock School (Mussoorie, India) a long time ago (1950s) and her fantastic accomplishments over the years.

This last week (12-19 September 2015) a friend sent me a link (Melwani below) which highlighted the Ganesh book by Gita Mehta – reminding me of the achievements of one of my high school classmates. Where have all my class mates gone?

Links below about Gita Mehta and Eternal Ganesha (Not in chronological order)
** Gita Mehta and Eternal Ganesha By Lavina Melwani • Sep 15th, 2015

** Eternal Ganesh by Gita Mehta (Oct 2, 2006)

** Ganesha is the hero of Gita Mehta's new book (Sept 14 2006)

** Editor Extraordinaire [Sonny (Ajai Singh) Mehta] (2009)
** June 2008  CONV: Photos of the 2008 Convention by Preston Merchant.
One photo of Gita with Sonny and Rubins 2008

Gita Mehta 1998 Painting

** Odisha: CM Naveen Patnaik's sister Gita Meheta in Bhubaneswar – 2 April 2012

** Book about Gita (December 31, 2008, 203 pages) Gita Mehta: Writing Home / Creating Homeland (Writers of the Indian Diaspora) By Usha Bande 

[End of 12 links about Gita Mehta]


Popular posts from this blog

Emperor Humayun's supper and breakfast - Mughal feasts #2

Mughal feast #2 was to cook four recipes for Emperor Humanyun from his section in the S. Husain "Emperor's Table". For his supper - a soup, lamb kebabs, and bread, and for his breakfast - an eggplant omelet. Listed as
1. Eshkaneh Shirazi or Yoghurt Soup Laced with Saffron
2. Luleh Kebab or Lamb Kebabs Wrapped in Bread
3. Naan-i-Tunak or Baked Flour Bread Flavoured with Mint
4. Kukuye Bademajan or Eggplant Omelet Served with Yoghurt
I cooked the supper items on Saturday evening the 12th of Feb 2011, eating the soup and kebabs over three evenings; while we cooked and ate half-recipe omelets for brunch the early afternoon of Sunday the 13th Feb, and the evening of Wednesday the 16th Feb.

Did they celebrate Valentines Day in the Mughal court? (of course not) Or if they would have, what foods do you think they would have cooked and eaten at the Court? What would a Mughal Valentines card look like? "To my wi…
Babur's supper - Mughal feasts, food, cuisine

I'm interested in Indian food, especially food from historic times, like the Mughal's. So, I'm going to experiment and cook some of the recipes from Salma Husain's The Emperor's Table (2008. ISBN: 8174364536).

We start with two recipes from the time of Emperor Babur (1494-1530), Karam Dulma or Stuffed Cabbage Rolls and Kyulcha or Spicy Wholewheat Baked Bread. I cooked these last night, Saturday the 5th of Februray 2011. I write a narrative of the details of making these below.

Overall? Very interesting tastes. I'd give the Karam Dulma an A- rating, while the bread or Kyulcha gets a B- or even C- rating. Very heavy food. I should have been content to eat just one of the Cabbage Rolls, but they were so, so good, rich, flavorful, juicy. And the bread turned out more like a stiff, spicy pie crust - don't know what's going on with that, but I have some suggestions (below). (See Picasa photo album)


On Gita

This blog post started out as a simple email reply to some questions about Gita Mehta aka Gita Patnaik, and went on far too long.  Only read what you wish.

Question 1. Have you read Gita's books?  If you want to know about all of Gita’s writings, check out this link on according to WorldCat It says she has "47 works in 296 publications in 15 languages and 5,485 library holdings." WorldCat has similar listings for all authors (see Philip McEldowney Only 6 works
I’ve greatly enjoyed reading her fiction (Raj and River Sutra), but never have gotten beyond the first few pages, for some reason, of her main non-fiction – Karma Kola, Snakes and Ladders.We (the UVa library) have those four books in our library, but not the coffee-table (non-academic) picture book Eternal Ganesh.
Question 2. Are “Sonny & Gita Mehta” listed in the credits of the “Vietnam” series running on PBS cur…